Gender pay gaps in average (mean) hourly earnings

Scoop.it ShareThis

From the graph we can see that in 2010 female employees in full-time work earned 84.5 per cent of the average (mean) hourly earnings of men.

Therefore, the graph shows that the full-time gender pay gap in hourly earnings was 15.5 per cent (UK). This has decreased from 36.2 per cent in 1970 (GB). The part-time women’s pay gap shows that women working part-time in the UK in 2010 earned 65.5 per cent of the average (mean) hourly earnings of men who worked full-time. The part-time women’s pay gap in 2010 (UK) was 34.5 per cent down from 48.5 per cent in 1970 (GB).

Sources

NES, 1970-97 (Equality and Human Rights Commission analysis).

Notes: All data for full-timers exclude overtime, but part-time figures include the effect of overtime. Prior to 1984, data are for women aged 18 and over and for men aged 21 and over. From 1984, they are for employees on adult rates. Data are for GB, not UK, as the NES did not cover Northern Ireland.

ONS, ASHE 1997-2010.

Notes: Data are for employees on adult rates and revised data shown as appropriate. 2004 data include supplementary information. 2006 and subsequent data are based on a new methodology adopted in 2007. 2006 data based on methodology used between 1997 and 2005 are in brackets, showing that the increase in the full-time gender pay gap between 2005 and 2006 was partly due to this methodological change.

Perfect, D. (2011) Gender Pay Gaps: Equality and Human Rights Commission – Briefing paper 2

The definition of gender pay gap and methodology is provided on pages 3 – 4 of  Perfect, D. (2011) Gender Pay Gaps: Equality and Human Rights Commission – Briefing paper 2.