CLOSER Policy alert: Call for evidence – impact of the gambling industry

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A row of gambling slot machinesOpportunity to inform the evidence base on the social and economic impact of the gambling industry.

In June, the House of Lords appointed a new Select Committee to consider the Social and Economic Impact of the Gambling Industry. This Committee seeks further to understand the issues, in an area where concrete evidence is lacking, and to explore options for improvement. The Committee has published its call for evidence and invites written submissions from all interested individuals and organisations.

Relevant questions that could be informed by longitudinal evidence include:

  • What are the social and economic costs of gambling? These might include costs associated with poor health and hospital inpatient services; welfare and employment costs; the cost of benefit claims; lost tax receipts; housing costs through statutory homelessness applications; and criminal justice costs.
  • How might we improve the quality and timeliness of research in the UK? What changes, if any, should be made to the current arrangements for funding, commissioning and evaluating research in the UK? What might be learned from international comparisons?
  • If, as the Responsible Gambling Strategy Board (RGSB) has suggested, there is limited evidence on which to base sound decisions about gambling by children and young people, what steps should be taken to rectify this situation?
  • How are new forms of technology, including social media, affecting children’s experiences of gambling? How are these experiences affecting gambling behaviour now, and how might they affect behaviour in the future?

The deadline for evidence submissions is Friday 6 September 2019.

For more information, take a look at the Select Committee website.

You can have your say by responding to the call for evidence. Download the full details of the call.


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