References

Scoop.it ShareThis

The following references are cited in the CLOSER resource: ‘Physical activity across age and study: a guide to data in six CLOSER studies’.

  1. Johnson, W., et al., How Has the Age-Related Process of Overweight or Obesity Development Changed over Time? Co-ordinated Analyses of Individual Participant Data from Five United Kingdom Birth Cohorts. PLoS Medicine, 2015. 12(5): p. e1001828; discussion e1001828.
  2. NCDRF Collaboration, Trends in Adult Body-Mass Index in 200 countries from 1975 to 2014: A Pooled Analysis of 1698 Population-based Measurement Studies with 19.2 million Participants. Lancet, 2016. 387(10026): p. 1377-1396.
  3. Butland, B. et al. Foresight, Tackling Obesities: Fut.ure Choices – Project Report (2nd edition). London, UK: Department of Innovation Universities and Skills; 2007.
  4. Rodriguez Manas, L., [The World Health Organization Report on Ageing and Health: A Fift for the Geriatrics Community]. Revista Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, 2016. 51(5): p. 249-51.
  5. Government Office for Science. Foresight, Future of an Ageing Population. London, UK: Government Office for Science; 2016.
  6. Das, P. and R. Horton, Physical Activity-Time to Take it Seriously and Regularly. Lancet, 2016. 388(10051): p. 1254-5.
  7. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (2nd edition). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2018.
  8. Young, D.R., et al., Sedentary Behavior and Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association. Circulation, 2016. 134(13): p. e262-79.
  9. Caspersen, C.J., K.E. Powell, and G.M. Christenson, Physical Activity, Exercise, and Physical Fitness: Definitions and Distinctions for Health-Related Research. Public health reports (Washington, D.C.: US), 1985. 100(2): p. 126-31.
  10. Intille, S.S., et al., New Horizons in Sensor Development. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2012. 44(1 Suppl 1): p. S24-31.
  11. Ainsworth, B., et al., The Current State of Physical Activity Assessment Tools. Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, 2015. 57(4): p. 387-395.
  12. Pate, R.R., J.R. O’Neill, and F. Lobelo, The Evolving Definition of Sedentary. Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, 2008. 36(4): p. 173-178.
  13. Morris, J.N., et al., Coronary Heart-Disease and Physical Activity of Work. The Lancet, 1953. 262(6795): p. 1053-1057.
  14. Bennett, D.A., et al., Association of Physical Activity With Risk of Major Cardiovascular Diseases in Chinese Men and Women. JAMA Cardiology, 2017. 2(12): p. 1349-1349.
  15. Li, J., et al., Physical Activity and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease—A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2012. 9(2): p. 391-407.
  16. Nocon, M., et al., Association of Physical Activity with All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation, 2008. 15(3): p. 239-246.
  17. Wilmot, E.G., et al., Sedentary Time in Adults and the Association with Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease and Death: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Diabetologia, 2012. 55(11): p. 2895-2905.
  18. Kyu, H.H., et al., Physical Activity and Risk of Breast Cancer, Colon Cancer, Diabetes, Ischemic Heart Disease, and Ischemic Stroke Events: Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. BMJ, 2016. 354: p. i3857-i3857.
  19. Lee, J., et al., Public Health Impact of Risk Factors for Physical Inactivity in Adults with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Arthritis Care & Research, 2012. 64(4): p. 488-93.
  20. Cartee, G.D., et al., Exercise Promotes Healthy Aging of Skeletal Muscle. Cell Metabolism, 2016. 23(6): p. 1034-1047.
  21. Moreira-Silva, I., et al., The Effects of Workplace Physical Activity Programs on Musculoskeletal Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Workplace Health Safety, 2016. 64(5): p. 210-22.
  22. Hamer, M. and Y. Chida, Physical Activity and Risk of Neurodegenerative Disease: A Systematic Review of Prospective Evidence. Psychological Medicine, 2009. 39(1): p. 3-11.
  23. Schuch, F. B., et al., Physical Activity and Incident Depression: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. American Journal of Psychiatry, 2018. 175(7): p. 631-648.
  24. Schuch, F.B., et al., Physical Activity Protects from Incident Anxiety: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Depression and Anxiety, 2019.
  25. Heath, G.W., et al., Evidence-Based Intervention in Physical Activity: Lessons from Around the World. The Lancet, 2012. 380(9838): p. 272-281.
  26. Richmond, R.C., et al., Assessing Causality in the Association Between Child Adiposity and Physical Activity Levels: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis. PLoS Medicine, 2014. 11(3): p. e1001618.
  27. Csizmadi, I., et al., Hours Spent and Energy Expended in Physical Activity Domains: Results from The Tomorrow Project cohort in Alberta, Canada. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2011. 8(1): p. 110-110.
  28. Dong, L., G. Block, and S. Mandel, Activities Contributing to Total Energy Expenditure in the United States: Results from the NHAPS Study. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2004. 1(1): p. 4-4.
  29. Bauman, A.E., et al., Correlates of Physical Activity: Why Are Some People Physically Active and Others Not? Lancet, 2012. 380(9838): p. 258-71.
  30. Beenackers, M.A., et al., Socioeconomic inequalities in occupational, leisure-time, and transport related physical activity among European adults: a systematic review. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2012. 9: p. 116.
  31. Blair, S.N., M.J. LaMonte, and M.Z. Nichaman, The evolution of physical activity recommendations: how much is enough? The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2004. 79(5): p. 913S-920S.
  32. Arem, H., et al., Leisure Time Physical Activity and Mortality. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2015. 175(6): p. 959-959.
  33. Moore, S.C., et al., Leisure Time Physical Activity of Moderate to Vigorous Intensity and Mortality: A Large Pooled Cohort Analysis. PLoS Medicine, 2012. 9(11): p. e1001335-e1001335.
  34. Samitz, G., M. Egger, and M. Zwahlen, Domains of Physical Activity and All-Cause Mortality: Systematic Review and Dose–Response Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. International Journal of Epidemiology, 2011. 40(5): p. 1382-1400.
  35. Aune, D., et al., Physical Activity and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Dose–Response Meta-Analysis. European Journal of Epidemiology, 2015. 30(7): p. 529-542.
  36. Li, J., A. Loerbroks, and P. Angerer, Physical Activity and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease. Current Opinion in Cardiology, 2013. 28(5): p. 575-583.
  37. Liu, L., et al., Leisure Time Physical Activity and Cancer Risk: Evaluation of the WHO’s Recommendation Based on 126 High-Quality Epidemiological Studies. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2016. 50(6): p. 372-8.
  38. Wu, Y., D. Zhang, and S. Kang, Physical Activity and Risk of Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 2013. 137(3): p. 869-882.
  39. Blair, S.N., et al., Influences of Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Other Precursors on Cardiovascular Disease and All-Cause Mortality in Men and Women. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 1996. 276(3): p. 205-205.
  40. Lee, P.H., et al., Validity of the international Physical Activity Questionnaire Short Rorm (IPAQ-SF): A Systematic Review. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2011. 8(1): p. 115-115.
  41. Myers, J., et al., Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Reclassification of Risk for Incidence of Heart Failure. Circulation: Heart Failure, 2017. 10(6).
  42. Bauman, A., et al., Cross-National Comparisons of Socioeconomic Differences in the Prevalence of Leisure-Time and Occupational Physical Activity, and Active Commuting in Six Asia-Pacific Countries. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 2011. 65(1): p. 35-43.
  43. Beenackers, M.A., et al., Socioeconomic Inequalities in Occupational, Leisure-Time, and Transport Related Physical Activity Among European Adults: A Systematic Review. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2012. 9(1): p. 116-116.
  44. van Uffelen, J.G.Z., et al., Occupational Sitting and Health Risks: A Systematic Review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2010. 39(4): p. 379-388.
  45. Holtermann, A., et al., The Physical Activity Paradox: Six Reasons Why Occupational Physical Activity (OPA) Does Not Confer the Cardiovascular Health Benefits That Leisure Time Physical Activity Does. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2018. 52(3): p. 149-150.
  46. Holtermann, A., et al., The Health Paradox of Occupational and Leisure-Time Physical Activity. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2012. 46(4): p. 291-295.
  47. Holtermann, A., et al., The Health Paradox of Occupational and Leisure-Time Physical Activity. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2012. 46(4): p. 291-5.
  48. Holtermann, A., et al., The Physical Activity Paradox: Six Reasons Why Occupational Physical Activity (OPA) Does Not Confer the Cardiovascular Health Benefits That Leisure Time Physical Activity Does. Br J Sports Medicine, 2018. 52(3): p. 149-150.
  49. Warburton, D.E.R. and S.S.D. Bredin, Health Benefits of Physical Activity. Current Opinion in Cardiology, 2017. 32(5): p. 541-556.
  50. Pizot, C., et al., Physical Activity, Hormone Replacement Therapy and Breast Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies. European Journal of Cancer, 2016. 52: p. 138-154.
  51. Buckley, J.P., et al., The Sedentary Office: An Expert Statement on the Growing Case for Change Towards Better Health and Productivity. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2015. 49(21): p. 1357-62.
  52. Clemes, S.A., S.E. OʼConnell, and C.L. Edwardson, Office Workersʼ Objectively Measured Sedentary Behavior and Physical Activity During and Outside Working Hours. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 2014. 56(3): p. 298-303.
  53. Ryan, C.G., et al., Sitting Patterns at Work: Objective Measurement of Adherence to Current Recommendations. Ergonomics, 2011. 54(6): p. 531-538.
  54. Active Lives Survey 2017/2018: Year 3 Technical Note. 2019, Ipsos MORI: Social Research Institute
  55. Laverty, A.A., et al., Active Travel to Work and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the United Kingdom. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2013. 45(3): p. 282-8.
  56. Mueller, N., et al., Health Impact Assessment of Active Transportation: A Systematic Review. Preventive Medicine, 2015. 76: p. 103-14.
  57. Hamer, M. and Y. Chida, Active Commuting and Cardiovascular Risk: A Meta-Analytic Review. Preventive Medicine, 2008. 46(1): p. 9-13.
  58. Saunders, L.E., et al., What Are the Health Benefits of Active Travel? A Systematic Review of Trials and Cohort Studies. PLoS ONE, 2013. 8(8): p. e69912-e69912.
  59. Tainio, M., et al., Can Air Pollution Negate the Health Benefits of Cycling and Walking? Preventive Medicine, 2016. 87: p. 233-236.
  60. Murphy, M.H., et al., Does Doing Housework Keep You Healthy? The Contribution of Domestic Physical Activity to Meeting Current Recommendations for Health. BMC Public Health, 2013. 13(1): p. 966-966.
  61. Besson, H., et al., Relationship between Subdomains of Total Physical Activity and Mortality. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2008. 40(11): p. 1909-1915.
  62. Stamatakis, E., M. Hamer, and D.A. Lawlor, Physical Activity, Mortality, and Cardiovascular Disease: Is Domestic Physical Activity Beneficial?: The Scottish Health Survey–1995, 1998, and 2003. American Journal of Epidemiology, 2009. 169(10): p. 1191-1200.
  63. Bellavia, A., et al., Physical Activity and Mortality in a Prospective Cohort of Middle-Aged and Elderly Men — A Time Perspective. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2013. 10(1): p. 94-94.
  64. Ekelund, U., et al., Does Physical Activity Attenuate, or Even Eliminate, the Detrimental Association of Sitting Time with Mortality? A Harmonised Meta-Analysis of Data from more than 1 million Men and Women. The Lancet, 2016. 388(10051): p. 1302-1310.
  65. Patterson, R., et al., Sedentary Behaviour and Risk of All-Cause, Cardiovascular and Cancer Mortality, and Incident Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Dose Response Meta-Analysis. European Journal of Epidemiology, 2018. 33(9): p. 811-829.
  66. Tremblay, M.S., et al., Sedentary Behavior Research Network (SBRN) – Terminology Consensus Project process and outcome. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2017. 14(1): p. 75-75.
  67. Biswas, A., et al., Sedentary Time and its Association with Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Annuals of Internal Medicine, 2015. 162(2): p. 123-32.
  68. Mansoubi, M., et al., The Relationship Between Sedentary Behaviour and Physical Activity in Adults: A Systematic Review. Preventive Medicine, 2014. 69: p. 28-35.
  69. Kohl, H.W., 3rd, et al., The Pandemic of Physical Inactivity: Global Action for Public Health. Lancet, 2012. 380(9838): p. 294-305.
  70. Biswas, A., et al., Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults. Annals of Internal Medicine, 2015. 162(2): p. 123-123.
  71. O’Donoghue, G., et al., A Systematic Review of Correlates of Sedentary Behaviour in Adults aged 18-65 years: A Socio-Ecological Approach. BMC Public Health, 2016. 16: p. 163.
  72. (WHO), W.H.O., 2013-2020 Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases. 2013.
  73. Guthold, R., et al., Worldwide Trends in Insufficient Physical Activity from 2001 to 2016: A Pooled Analysis of 358 Population-Based Surveys with 1.9 million Participants. Lancet Glob Health, 2018. 6(10): p. e1077-e1086.
  74. Troiano, R.P., et al., Evolution of Accelerometer Methods for Physical Activity Research. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2014. 48(13): p. 1019-23.
  75. van Poppel, M.N.M., et al., Physical Activity Questionnaires for Adults. Sports Medicine, 2010. 40(7): p. 565-600.
  76. Tucker, J.M., G.J. Welk, and N.K. Beyler, Physical Activity in U.S. Adults. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2011. 40(4): p. 454-461.
  77. Welk, G.J., et al., Calibration of Self-Report Measures of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2017. 49(7): p. 1473-1481.
  78. Hills, A.P., N. Mokhtar, and N.M. Byrne, Assessment of Physical Activity and Energy Expenditure: An Overview of Objective Measures. Frontiers in Nutrition, 2014. 1: p. 5-5.
  79. Trost, S.G., K.L. McIver, and R.R. Pate, Conducting Accelerometer-Based Activity Assessments in Field-Based Research. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2005. 37(Supplement): p. S531-S543.
  80. Bai, Y., et al., Comparison of Consumer and Research Monitors under Semistructured Settings. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2016. 48(1): p. 151-158.
  81. Chaix, B., et al., Combining Sensor Tracking with a GPS-Based Mobility Survey to Better Measure Physical Activity in Trips: Public Transport Generates Walking. International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2019. 16(1): p. 84.
  82. Lee, J.-M., Y. Kim, and G.J. Welk, Validity of Consumer-Based Physical Activity Monitors. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2014. 46(9): p. 1840-1848.
  83. Care, D.o.H.a.S., UK Chief Medical Officers’ Physical Activity Guidelines 2019.
  84. Golubic, R., et al., Levels of Physical Activity Among a Nationally Representative Sample of People in Early Old Age: Results of Objective and Self-Reported Assessments. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2014. 11(1): p. 58-58.
  85. Griffiths, L.J., et al., How Active Are Our Children? Findings from the Millennium Cohort Study. BMJ open, 2013. 3(8): p. e002893-e002893.
  86. Silverwood, R.J., et al., Characterizing Longitudinal Patterns of Physical Activity in Mid-Adulthood Using Latent Class Analysis: Results From a Prospective Cohort Study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 2011. 174(12): p. 1406-1415.
  87. Mawditt, C., et al., The Clustering of Health-Related Behaviours in a British Population Sample: Testing for Cohort Differences. Preventive Medicine, 2016. 88: p. 95-107.
  88. Elhakeem, A., et al., Motor Performance in Early Life and Participation in Leisure-Time Physical Activity up to Age 68 years. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 2018. 32(4): p. 327-334.
  89. Pinto Pereira, S.M., L. Li, and C. Power, Early-Life Predictors of Leisure-Time Physical Inactivity in Midadulthood: Findings From a Prospective British Birth Cohort. American Journal of Epidemiology, 2014. 180(11): p. 1098-1108.
  90. Bann, D., et al., Physical Activity Across Adulthood in Relation to Fat and Lean Body Mass in Early Old Age: Findings From the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development, 1946-2010. American Journal of Epidemiology, 2014. 179(10): p. 1197-1207.
  91. Dodds, R., et al., Physical Activity Levels Across Adult Life and Grip Strength in Early Old Age: Updating Findings from a British Birth Cohort. Age and Ageing, 2013. 42(6): p. 794-8.
  92. Pinto Pereira, S.M., M.-C. Geoffroy, and C. Power, Depressive Symptoms and Physical Activity During 3 Decades in Adult Life. JAMA Psychiatry, 2014. 71(12): p. 1373-1373.
  93. Richards, M., R. Hardy, and M.E.J. Wadsworth, Does Active Leisure Protect Cognition? Evidence from a National Birth Cohort. Social Science & Medicine, 2003. 56(4): p. 785-792.
  94. Wadsworth, M., et al., Cohort profile: The 1946 National Birth Cohort (MRC National Survey of Health and Development). International Journal of Epidemiology, 2006. 35(1): p. 49-54.
  95. Kuh, D., et al., Cohort Profile: Updating the Cohort Profile for the MRC National Survey of Health and Development: A New Clinic-Based Data Collection for Ageing Research. International Journal of Epidemiology, 2011. 40(1): p. e1-9.
  96. Kuh, D., et al., The MRC National Survey of Health and Development Reaches Age 70: Maintaining Participation at Older Ages in a Birth Cohort Study. European Journal of Epidemiology, 2016. 31(11): p. 1135-1147.
  97. Taylor, H.L., et al., A Questionnaire for the Assessment of Leisure Time Physical Activities. Journal of Chronic Diseases, 1978. 31(12): p. 741-55.
  98. Day, N., et al., EPIC-Norfolk: Study Design and Characteristics of the Cohort. European Prospective Investigation of Cancer. British Journal of Cancer, 1999. 80 Suppl 1: p. 95-103.
  99. Dodds, R., et al., Physical Activity Levels Across Adult life and Grip Strength in Early Old Age: Updating Findings from a British Birth Cohort. Age Ageing, 2013. 42(6): p. 794-8.
  100. Hannam, K., et al., A Novel Accelerometer-Based Method to Describe Day-to-Day Exposure to Potentially Osteogenic Vertical Impacts in Older Adults: Findings from a Multi-Cohort Study. Osteoporosis International, 2017. 28(3): p. 1001-1011.
  101. Power, C. and J. Elliott, Cohort Profile: 1958 British Birth Cohort (National Child Development Study). International Journal of Epidemiology, 2006. 35(1): p. 34-41.
  102. Elliott, J. and P. Shepherd, Cohort Profile: 1970 British Birth Cohort (BCS70). I International Journal of Epidemiology, 2006. 35(4): p. 836-43.
  103. Boyd, A., et al., Cohort Profile: The ‘Children of the 90s’–The Index Offspring of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. International Journal of Epidemiology, 2013. 42(1): p. 111-27.
  104. Fraser, A., et al., Cohort Profile: The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children: ALSPAC Mothers Cohort. International Journal of Epidemiology, 2013. 42(1): p. 97-110.
  105. Connelly, R. and L. Platt, Cohort profile: UK Millennium Cohort Study (MCS). International Journal of Epidemiology, 2014. 43(6): p. 1719-25.